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The Pharmacist's Role in Disasters

Broadcast Date: August 15, 2007
(1 hour, 30 minutes)

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Handouts (7 pages)

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Program Overview

Hurricanes, tornadoes, bioterrorism, and pandemic flu are all examples of events that create emergencies for the public health system. Such events have disrupted the lives and healthcare of thousands of individuals and will do so again in the future. Regardless of the type of event, when such emergencies occur, communities and individuals face real difficulties related to the need to obtain and properly use pharmaceutical products or the need to maintain appropriate pharmaceutical therapies. Pharmacists serve the fundamental role in our ability, as a society, to initiate a pharmaceutical emergency response where needed, and to maintain appropriate pharmaceutical care for a damaged community.

The broadcast faculty in this session will discuss the changing role of the pharmacist in the public health system as well as the specific roles of the pharmacist during a public health emergency response. They will also present examples from the experiences of the pharmacy community during the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

Faculty

Stuart Capper
Professor and Director
Institute for Public Health and Pharmacy
Samford University

Michael Hogue
Assistant Professor
McWhorter School of Pharmacy
Samford University

Charlie Thomas, BPharm, RPh, FAPhA
State Pharmacy Director
Alabama State Department of Public Health

Target Audience

Pharmacists, pharmacy students, state or local public health workers, nurses, physicians and clinicians.

Contact Hours

None for this program.

Contact for Technical Assistance

334-206-5618 or email ALPHTN

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